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Law Enforcement (A.A.S.)

The Law Enforcement Associate in Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.) is part of the Professional Peace Officer Education Program requirement for the Minnesota Peace Officer licensing standards. All course work is certified by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) and meets the mandated learning objectives. The degree also applies for those interested in other areas of the justice system. However, this program is NOT designed to be a two-year transferable program.

64 Credits

Core Requirements (31 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ANI 100 OR 200 Introduction to Anishinaabe Studies or Indigenous Leadership 3  
BIO 111 General Biology & Lab 4  
EDU 102 Path to Success 3  
ENGL 101 English Composition I 3 EDU 102
ITECH 100 Computer Applications I 3  
POLSC 225 Treaty Law and Tribal Sovereignty 3  
PSY 100 General Psychology 3  
PSY 220 or 140 Abnormal Psychology or Developmental Psychology 3 PSY 100
SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3  
SPCH 201 Speech and Communications 3 ENGL 101

Law Enforcement Required Courses (33 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
LE 105 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3  
LE 110 Minnesota Traffic Law 3  
LE 111 Minnesota Statutes 3 ITECH 100
LE 122 Constitutional Law and Civil Liability 3 LE 111
LE 150 Report Writing 3 ENGL 101
LE 210 Juvenile Delinquency and Justice 3 LE 122
LE 211 Community Policing 3 LE 122
LE 221 Evidence, Procedure, and Criminal Investigations 3 LE 122
LE 227 Policing Tribal Lands 3 POLSC 225
LE 280 Police Ethics 3  
PE 100 Physical Conditioning 3  

Non-Course Requirement:

  EMS First Responder    

ANI 100 (3 Credits)

Introduction to Anishinaabe Studies

This course introduces students to the content areas of the Anishinaabe curriculum. The word Anishinaabe refers to all Indigenous people of North America. Content includes an overview of Anishinaabe culture, history, and philosophy, federal Indian [sic] policy, land and environment, gender roles, and contemporary social issues.

BIO 111 (4 credits)

General Biology I

This course is an introduction to animal and plant biology, including traditional herbs and plants used by the Anishinaabe people. Emphasis of this course is on studies from a whole system perspective. It includes principles of biodiversity and ecology and their relationship to humans. Both Indigenous and Western scientific views will be explored. Lecture and laboratory

ENGL 101 (3 credits)

English Composition I

This course reviews the basics of sentence construction and essay development; emphasizes style, organization, coherence, and persuasion in written discourse; and provides extensive practice in communication skills: reading, critical thinking, speaking, listening, and writing. College Placement Test required (students not scoring a passing grade on the exam must successfully complete EDU 102 prior to enrolling in ENGL 101).

ITECH 100 (3 credits)

Computer Applications I

This course will cover the basic use of computers. Topics include the history and impact of computers, computer systems, and an introduction to hardware and software applications, such as operating systems, e-mail, internet browsers, search engines, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics.

SPCH 201 (3 credits)

Speech and Communications

This course will teach speaking and listening skills that will be reinforced through multiple opportunities for interpersonal communication, public speaking, discussion, and the oral tradition of Ojibwe people. They will gain experience in critical thinking, reading, and writing, as well as in public speaking. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ITECH 150 (3 credits)

Computer Applications II

This course focuses on expanding the student's understanding, use, and integration of office productivity tools and integrating those tools into projects. Emphasis will be on word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics software, but may also include other relevant topics. Prerequisite: ITECH 100 or equivalent.

TA 210 (3 credits)

Tribal Administration/Policy

This course covers special topics in political, legal, social, economic, and sovereignty issues in tribal management. Emphasis on tribal perspective in organization and implementing business strategies. Prerequisite: Completion of 100-level Business Management core courses.

POLSC 225 (3 credits)

Treaty Law and Tribal Sovereignty

This course is an introduction to treaty law and history and analysis of major treaties affecting the Anishinaabe nation. Course draws on actual treaty documents and on case law, which explicates those documents. Theory and practice of self-determination for indigenous peoples and tribal sovereignty are emphasized.

ANI 200 (3 credits)

Indigenous American Leadership

This course allows each student to build a personal vision of and commitment to community engagement. Students will explore concepts of "leadership" in society and in Anishinaabe communities. Through several active learning modules, students will gain confidence through achievement in identifying community concerns, developing and doing service-related projects, and reflecting actively on their experience. Emphasis will be on Anishinaabe philosophies, communication and behavior.

PSY 100 (3 credits)

General Psychology

This course provides an overview of the field of psychology. The course explores the history and development of psychology, and the major theoretical viewpoints. This exploration includes: the biological basis of behavior; sensation and perception; learning, memory, and intelligence; motivation and emotion; development lifespan; personality; psychological disorders; and social behavior. The course focuses on critical thinking skills and pays particular attention to the role of culture in psychological processes, research and study.

PSY 220 (3 credits)

Abnormal Psychology

This course examines contemporary research and theory pertaining to the nature, causes, diagnosis and treatment of psychopathology. The course will focus on how genetics, disease and environmental factors contribute to specific psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or PSY 140.

PSY 140 (3 credits)

Developmental Psychology

This course examines contemporary research, theory and everyday applications, in the study of human development over the lifespan. We will focus on continuity and change within the individual in areas of cognition, personality, social interaction, and physical development. Critical thinking skills and the role of culture in developmental processes, research and study will be emphasized.

SOC 101 (3 credits)

Introduction to Sociology

This course provides an introduction to sociology as a way of viewing and understanding the world. Sociology is a field of study that explains social, political, and economic phenomena in terms of social structures, social forces, and group relations. Important sociological topics, including socialization, culture, stratification, deviance, race and ethnicity, and poverty will be explored.

SPCH 201 (3 credits)

Speech and Communications

This course will teach speaking and listening skills that will be reinforced through multiple opportunities for interpersonal communication, public speaking, discussion, and the oral tradition of Ojibwe people. They will gain experience in critical thinking, reading, and writing, as well as in public speaking. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

LE 105 (3 credits)

Introduction to Criminal Justice

This course is an introduction to the criminal justice system including the police, courts, and correctional systems. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course.

LE 110 (3 credits)

Minnesota Traffic Law

This course is a detailed study of the Minnesota Traffic Statutes and how they are interpreted, applied and enforced. Vehicle registration and insurance requirements, licenses and permits, driving conduct statutes, required equipment and proper functioning mandates, and selected statutes regarding commercial vehicles and loading. Complete coverage of DWI statutes, detecting violations consistent with impaired driving, and processing of impaired drivers. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course.

LE 111 (3 credits)

Minnesota Statutes

This course is a study of Minnesota statutory law to include criminal code, sentencing, selected statutes for peace officers, and peace officer duties as related to Minnesota state law. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course.

LE 122 (3 credits)

Constitutional Law & Civil Liability

This course is a comprehensive study of the general principles of the United States Constitution, its Amendments, and legal requirements governing enforcement of the criminal code. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: LE 110 and LE 111

LE 150 (3 credits)

Report Writing

This course will teach the student the unique police report writing procedures required of law enforcement officers. The focus will be on documenting the chain of evidence and chronological events applicable to criminal investigations. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and ITECH 100

LE 210 (3 credits)

Juvenile Delinquency and Justice

This course is an examination of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system including its history, definitions, and explanations of delinquency. Students will analyze the juvenile court system with a focus on specific requirements for the processing of juvenile offenders. This course includes concepts and issues of status offenses, diversion and placements for juveniles, gang membership, and intervention strategies. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: LE 105, LE 111 and LE 122

LE 211 (3 credits)

Community Policing

This course analyzes the function and role of the local police in the United States from three perspectives: police-citizen interaction, agency-community relations, and legal-ethical issues of policing in a diverse, democratic society. Explores victims’ rights and law enforcements state mandated responsibilities concerning victims. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: LE 105, LE 111 and LE 122

LE 221 (3 credits)

Evidence, Procedure & Criminal Investigations

This course is a comprehensive study of the lawful gathering and evaluation of information concerning criminal acts with a focus on the fundamentals and rules of investigation and evidence collection, including the knowledge and skills necessary for criminal investigation, crime scene management, the collection of evidence and the importance of maintaining the chain of custody. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: LE 122

LE 227 (3 credits)

Policing Tribal Lands

This course includes an overview of the development of tribal law enforcement from pre-contact to present with a focus on the changing loci of criminal jurisdiction on Indian land in relation to tribal sovereignty. This course also includes introductory analysis of sovereignty issues. Prerequisites: LE 105 and LE 111.

LE 280 (3 credits)

Police Ethics

This course is an exploration of police ethical concerns, perceptions, and the history and effects of police deviance and corruption. Police abuse of authority, the code of silence, and police brutality will be discussed. Police prejudice and discrimination will be examined. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course.

PE 100 (3 credits)

Physical Conditioning

This course is designed to provide a basic knowledge of the factors involved in a healthy lifestyle. The physical fitness is designed specifically for job-related strength, agility, flexibility, speed, and cardiovascular endurance. Minnesota P.O.S.T. objectives will be covered in this course.