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Early Childhood Education

This program is designed for students to receive an Associate in Arts Degree in Early Childhood Education. The program will provide students with an opportunity to customize their educational background to fit the student’s future four-year Early Childhood Education major. Leech Lake Tribal College offers a combination of culturally relevant course work, general liberal arts courses, interactive education classes, and practical experience with young children. Instructors provide individual assistance and classroom experiences that address many individual learning styles.

60-62 Credits

Core Requirements (29 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ANI 100 Introduction to Anishinaabe Studies 3  
BIO 111 General Biology & Lab 4  
EDU 102 Path to Success 3  
ENGL 101 English Composition I 3 EDU102
ENGL 102 English Composition II 3 ENGL101
ITECH 100 Computer Applications I 3  
OJI 101 Speaking Ojibwe I 4  
OJI 111 Speaking Ojibwe with Children/Creative Ojibwe Classroom 3 OJI101
SPCH 201 Speech and Communications 3 ENGL101

Natural Sciences (3 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
BIO 112 General Biology II & Lab 4 BIO111
Or CHEM 100 Foundations of Chemistry & Lab 4  
Or CHEM 111 General Chemistry I & Lab 4 CHEM 100
Or CHEM 112 General Chemistry II & Lab 4 CHEM 111
Or PSCI 100 Introduction to Physical Science & Lab 4  
Or PSCI 110 Introduction to Earth Science & Lab 4  
Or PSCI 150 Indigenous Astronomy 3  
Or BIO 204 Environmental Science 3  

Mathematical/Logical Reasoning (3 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
MATH 140 Concepts in Mathematics 4  
Or MATH 150 College Algebra 3  
Or MATH 155 Advanced College Algebra 3 MATH 150
Or MATH 210 Pre-Calculus 3 MATH 155
Or MATH 250 Calculus 3 MATH 210

History and Social Sciences (6 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ECE 180 or PSY 140 Child Growth and Development or Developmental Psychology 3  
ECE 222 Infant and Toddler Development 3  

Humanities and Arts (6 Credits)

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ECE 210 Creative Activities with Children 3 ECE 180

Choose another course from above or below.

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ENGL 200 Literature and the Environment 3 ENGL 102
Or PHIL 200 Indigenous American Philosophy 3  

Human Diversity (3 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ECE 201 The Exceptional Child: Children with Special Needs 3 ECE 180

Ethical and Civic Responsibility (3 Credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ECE 220 Relations/Management in Child Development 3 ECE 180

People and the Environment (3 credits):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ECE 240 Children, Families and Communities 3 ECE 220

Early Childhood Education Required Courses (4 credits minimum):

Course Code Course Title Credits Pre-Req
ECE 298 *CDA Transfer Equivalence 6 CDA
ECE 299 Early Childhood Practicum 4 Inst. App.

All ECE

ANI 100 (3 Credits)

Introduction to Anishinaabe Studies

This course introduces students to the content areas of the Anishinaabe curriculum. The word Anishinaabe refers to all Indigenous people of North America. Content includes an overview of Anishinaabe culture, history, and philosophy, federal Indian [sic] policy, land and environment, gender roles, and contemporary social issues.

BIO 111 (4 credits)

General Biology I

This course is an introduction to animal and plant biology, including traditional herbs and plants used by the Anishinaabe people. Emphasis of this course is on studies from a whole system perspective. It includes principles of biodiversity and ecology and their relationship to humans. Both Indigenous and Western scientific views will be explored. Lecture and laboratory

EDU 102 111 (3 credits)

Path to Success

This course is designed to help students negotiate the complexities of college; from selecting classes and completing degree requirements to finding one's way through the financial aid maze. Study skills such as effective reading strategies, note-taking, and time management will be taught. The course will infuse English language writing and reading skills by incorporating best practices throughout the course. Opportunities for students to apply these skills in their current courses and texts will be provided. In addition, students will have the opportunity to explore Anishinaabe values and how these values apply to their own lives.

ENGL 101 (3 credits)

English Composition I

This course reviews the basics of sentence construction and essay development; emphasizes style, organization, coherence, and persuasion in written discourse; and provides extensive practice in communication skills: reading, critical thinking, speaking, listening, and writing. College Placement Test required (students not scoring a passing grade on the exam must successfully complete EDU 102 prior to enrolling in ENGL 101).

ENGL 102 (3 credits)

English Composition II

This course reviews components of ENGL 101 and refines general composition skills; emphasizes expository and argumentative writing, including researched, documented essays; and provides a study of research methods and sources, with emphasis on analytical reading. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

ITECH 100 (3 credits)

Computer Applications I

This course will cover the basic use of computers. Topics include the history and impact of computers, computer systems, and an introduction to hardware and software applications, such as operating systems, e-mail, internet browsers, search engines, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics.

OJI 101 (4 credits)

Speaking Ojibwe I

This course emphasizes values, learning the sounds of Ojibwe, developing introductory conversational skills, and understanding the concepts of language with the goal of using language in everyday life in Ojibwe communities.

OJI 111 (3 credits)

Speaking Ojibwe II

This course is a continuation of Ojibwe I, placing emphasis on values, vocabulary development and more conversational skills. Prerequisite: OJI 101.

SPCH 201 (3 credits)

Speech and Communications

This course will teach speaking and listening skills that will be reinforced through multiple opportunities for interpersonal communication, public speaking, discussion, and the oral tradition of Ojibwe people. They will gain experience in critical thinking, reading, and writing, as well as in public speaking. Prerequisite: ENGL 101.

BIO 112 (4 credits)

General Biology II

This course is an introduction to the structure and function of living systems, focusing on unifying biological principles such as the scientific method, cell theory, cell structure and function, genetics and inheritance, and evolution. Lecture and laboratory. Required for A.A. STEM emphasis. Prerequisite: BIO 111.

CHEM 100 (4 credits)

Foundations of Chemistry

This course will cover the basic principles and concepts of inorganic, organic, and biological chemistry. Topics will include states of matter, measurements, elements, atoms and the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical equations, gases, liquids and solids, energy and equilibrium reaction, acid-base and oxidation reduction. Lecture and laboratory

CHEM 111 (4 credits)

General Chemistry I

This course is an in-depth survey of inorganic chemistry. This course stresses the concepts and language of chemistry, including periodic properties, reactions, mathematics and algebraic manipulation of existing formulas, physical chemistry, and environmental issues dealing with the topic of atmospheric gases and surface groundwater. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or equivalent

CHEM 112 (4 credits)

General Chemistry II

This course is an advanced study of inorganic chemistry. Topics include in-depth mathematical formulas of chemistry and their manipulation, acid-base chemistry, complex reactions and their prediction, thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, metallurgy, and an introduction to organic chemistry. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or equivalent.

PSCI 100 (4 credits)

Introduction to Physical Science

This course is an introduction to the general principles of physics examining natural forces in nature such as gravity, velocity, acceleration, mass, density, temperature, heat, magnetic and electricity. Also included is the analysis of atoms, elements, compounds, solar system, geological forces, and the universe. Lecture and laboratory

PSCI 110 (4 credits)

Introduction to Earth Science

An introduction into the earth sciences as examined through the central concepts of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and the solar system. Each of these topics will be interpreted within the context of the earth's materials and how they interact within the interior and surface. Lecture and laboratory.

PSCI 150 (3 credits)

Indigenous Astronomy

This course will examine the history of astronomy, the science of stellar and solar system formation, the evolution of stars and galaxies, and modern cosmology and the fate of the universe. Special emphasis will be place on the scientific and cultural knowledge of astronomy relative to various Indigenous groups of the Americas, including Ojibwe, Lakota, Pawnee, Maya, and other indigenous nations. Lecture and laboratory

BIO 204 (3 credits)

Enviromental Science

This course introduces biological, ecological, chemical, physical, and social principles underlying environmental issues. Special emphasis will be placed on Indigenous values pertaining to the environment, and to the effects of modern technology on the environment. Examination of the impacts of human activities and the technological options for environmental protection are researched.

MATH 140 (4 credits)

Concepts in Mathmatics

This course includes operation of integers, solving equations, linear equations in two variables, introduction to descriptive statistics with analysis of single variable data, and a conceptual understanding and application of mathematics in everyday life. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the Mathematics Placement Test or MATH 093 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 150 (3 credits)

College Algebra

This course includes algebraic concepts including linear, quadratic, rational and absolute value equations and inequalities; function notation; complex numbers; graphs of relations and functions including lines and parabolas. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the Mathematics Placement Test or MATH 093 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 155 (3 credits)

Advanced College Algebra

This course covers functions, including polynomial, rational, inverse, exponential, and logarithmic; systems of equations and inequalities, and matrices. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the Mathematics Placement Test or MATH 150 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 210 (3 credits)

Pre-Calculus I

This course provides the essential mathematical background needed in calculus. Topics include equation solving, functions (including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric), identities, applications, and parametric equations. A graphing calculator is required. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the Mathematics Placement Test or MATH 155 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 250 (4 credits)

Calculus I

This course includes a review of functions, with emphasis on the graphing and behavior of functions. Limits are introduced and developed. The derivative of a function is defined and applied to algebraic and trigonometric functions. Applications involving maximum, minimum, related rates, curve plotting, and the mean value theorem are presented. Prerequisite: An appropriate score on the Mathematics Placement Test or MATH 210 with a grade of C or better.

ENGL 200 (3 credits)

Literature and the Environment

This course explores the concept of "environment" through different literary modes and examines the historical development of the environmentalist movement in North America. Emphasis will be placed upon reading, critical thinking, and writing in MLA style format. Prerequisites: ENGL 102.

PHIL 200 (3 credits)

Indigenous American Philosophy

This course is an introduction to the philosophical worldview of the people of Leech Lake and other Indigenous peoples of North America. Content area includes study of ontology, epistemology, and ethics; creation stories and myths; how Indigenous American philosophy is affected by historical events; and how Indigenous Americans have tried to solve philosophical issues, past and present.

BIO 204 (3 credits)

Enviromental Science

This course introduces biological, ecological, chemical, physical, and social principles underlying environmental issues. Special emphasis will be placed on Indigenous values pertaining to the environment, and to the effects of modern technology on the environment. Examination of the impacts of human activities and the technological options for environmental protection are researched.

ECE 180 (3 credits)

Child Growth and Development

This course introduces students to the fundamental psychological principles of children's physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth and development, and how these principles can be applied to facilitate learning. Multicultural and traditional Anishinaabe viewpoints will be explored. Students will begin to develop an individual portfolio of educational materials.

PSY 140 (3 credits)

Developmental Psychology

This course examines contemporary research, theory and everyday applications, in the study of human development over the lifespan. We will focus on continuity and change within the individual in areas of cognition, personality, social interaction, and physical development. Critical thinking skills and the role of culture in developmental processes, research and study will be emphasized.

ECE 222 (3 credits)

Infant and Toddler Development

This course provides an overview of infant/toddler learning experiences in home or center-based settings through the arrangement of physical setting, provision of materials, construction of curriculum, and implementation of learning experiences. Learners will integrate knowledge of developmental needs, developmentally appropriate environments, and effective care-giving and teaching methods in an approved lab setting.

ECE 210 (3 credits)

Creative Activities for Children

This course explores the principles and characteristics of creative teaching. Students will learn to apply creative methodology to all curriculum areas. Multiple intelligence theories will be explored. The development of culturally relevant and multi-cultural materials will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ECE 180.

ECE 201 (3 credits)

The Exceptional Child: Children with Special Needs

This course explores the development of children with special needs and focuses on integrating children with special needs into child care and educational settings. Prerequisite: ECE 180

ECE 220 (3 credits)

Relations and Management in Child Development

This course explores and develops skills in relations with young children, parents, and co-workers anti-bias techniques for building and maintaining an encouraging classroom are addressed. Prerequisite: ECE 180.

ECE 240 (3 credits)

Children, Families and Communities

This course is designed to increase the student's capacity to build positive relationships with parents and other family members. A variety of issues will be addressed, such as providing a culturally sensitive environment, parent involvement in the classroom, emotional/social development of young children, communication with difficult families, and working with diverse communities. Students will be responsible for developing an event appropriate for families with young children. Prerequisite: ECE 220.

ECE 298 (6 credits)

CDA Transfer Equivalence

In order to register for this course, students must have a valid CDA. This will enable students to receive credit for ECE 180 and ECE 220. With the completion of this course, the student will also be given credit for ECE 299. Prerequisite: Valid CDA Certificate on file with Director of Enrollment Services.

ECE299 (4 credits)

Preschool Practicum

This course provides the student with field experience in an early childhood setting. Observations and evaluations will be conducted by the tribal college education faculty. Student presentations will be observed. Application of theories and techniques discussed in the classroom will be emphasized. Individual student portfolios will be completed. Prerequisite: General education requirements and instructor approval.